Allo' Expat Trinidad & Tobago - Connecting Expats in Trinidad & Tobago
Main Homepage
Allo' Expat Trinidad & Tobago  Logo


Subscribe to Allo' Expat Newsletter
 
Check our Rates
   Information Center Trinidad & Tobago
Trinidad & Tobago General Information
Trinidad & Tobago Expatriates Handbook
Trinidad & Tobago and Foreign Government
Trinidad & Tobago General Listings
Trinidad & Tobago Useful Tips
Trinidad & Tobago Education & Medical
Trinidad & Tobago Travel & Tourism Info
 
Airlines
Hotels
Car Rentals
Getting Around
Tour Operators
Travel & Holiday Tips
Trinidad & Tobago Lifestyle & Leisure
Trinidad & Tobago Business Matters
  Sponsored Links


Check our Rates

Travel & Holiday Tips in Trinidad & Tobago
 
 
 

General

The home of carnival, steel bands, calypso and limbo dancing, Trinidad & Tobago’s blend of different cultures gives them an air of cosmopolitan excitement.

Port-of-Spain, surrounded by lush green hills, is the capital and business hub of oil-rich Trinidad. Bazaars throng beneath modern skyscrapers and mosques rub shoulders with cathedrals. San Fernando is the island’s second town and the main commercial centre in the south. Close by is the fascinating natural phenomenon of the Pitch Lake, a 36-hectare (90-acre) lake of asphalt which constantly replenishes itself.

Tobago, some 32 km (20 miles) to the northeast of Trinidad, is very different from her sister isle. The island is so beautiful and fertile that just about every western European colonial power has fought to have it. It is a tranquil island with calm waters and a number of fine beaches, each with their own flavour.

Trinidad

Port-of-Spain

The home of carnival, steel bands, calypso and limbo dancing, Trinidad & Tobago's blend of different cultures gives them an air of cosmopolitan excitement. Port of Spain, surrounded by the lush green hills of the Northern Range, is the capital and business hub of oil-rich Trinidad. The city captures the variety of Trinidadian life, with bazaars thronging beneath modern skyscrapers and mosques rubbing shoulders with cathedrals. The architecture of the city incorporates a mixture of styles: these include Victorian houses with gingerbread fretwork; the German Renaissance Queen's Royal College; Stollmeyer's Castle, an imitation of a Bavarian Castle; the President of the Republic's residence and the Prime Minister's office at Whitehall (both built in Moorish style); and the 19th-century Gothic Holy Trinity Cathedral. Places of interest include the shopping district centred on Frederick Street; the Royal Botanic Gardens; the Red House (a stately colonial building, now the seat of government) and the National Museum and Art Gallery.

The magnificent Queen's Park Savannah, to the north of the capital and within walking distance, is spread out at the foot of the Northern Range. A mixture of natural and man-made beauty, with attractive trees and shrubs (including the African Tulip, or 'Flame of the Forest'), it forms a backdrop to playing fields and elaborate mansions, now mostly government offices and embassies. On the outskirts of the city is Fort George. Built in 1804, it offers an excellent view of Port of Spain and the mountains of northern Venezuela.

Maracas Bay, Las Cuevas and Chaguaramas are the nearest beaches to Port of Spain. Maracas tends to be the place to go after Carnival has finished. Approximately 13 km (8 miles) to the south of the capital by road and boat is the Caroni Bird Sanctuary, home of the Scarlet Ibis. The Diego Mountain Valley, 16 km (10 miles) from Port of Spain, contains one of the island's most beautiful water wheels.

Around Trinidad

In the rapidly expanding town of Chaguanas, it is possible to sample a wide range of West Indian culinary specialities, particularly East Indian fare. Arima, the third-largest town on the island, has an Amerindian Museum at the Cleaver Woods Recreation Center in the west of town and the nation's new horse racing track. About 13 km (8 miles) north is the Asa Wright Nature Centre at Blanchisseuse, containing a collection of rare specimens such as the Oilbird or Guacharo. The Aripo Caves are noted for their stalactites and stalagmites. Asa Wright is a must for birdwatching enthusiasts. There is a good hotel there, but rooms are limited and need to be booked well in advance.

On the east coast is Valencia, a lush tropical forest near the Hollis Reservoir. Cocal and Mayaro are also worth visiting. San Fernando is the island's second town and the main commercial centre in the south. Close by is the fascinating natural phenomenon of the Pitch Lake, a 36.4 hectare (90 acre) lake of asphalt which constantly replenishes itself.

Tobago

Tobago is very different from her sister isle 32 km (20 miles) away. It is a tranquil island with calm waters and vast stretches of white sand beaches. In the east, the volcanic part of the island is precipitous and heavily wooded, with the oldest protected rainforest in the western hemisphere. The island is so beautiful and fertile that just about every western European colonial power has fought to have it.

Scarborough

The capital, Scarborough, has many quaint houses which spill down from the hilltop to the waterside, as well as interesting Botanical Gardens. It is overshadowed by the Fort King George built in 1779 during the many struggles between the French and the English, an excellent point from which to view the sunset. The Court House built in 1825 is today used as the meeting place for the Tobago House of Assembly, while Tobago Museum showcases artefacts from Tobago's early American Indian and colonial days.

There are a number of fine beaches throughout the island, each with their own flavour. They include Pigeon Point on the northwest coast (admission is charged for use of facilities); Store Bay and Turtle Beach, where brown pelicans can be seen diving into the waters to catch fish; Man O'War Bay, at the opposite end of the island; and Mount Irvine and Bacolet Bays. It is worth remembering that there is no such thing as a private beach in Trinidad & Tobago, and though some hotels discourage the use of their facilities, most do not mind unless they are very busy, especially if you use their bar and beach restaurants. Many beaches have public facilities. Buccoo Reef is an extensive coral reef lying a mile offshore from Pigeon Point. Excursions can be made in glass-bottomed boats and it is an excellent place for snorkeling. These trips run from Store Bay or Pigeon Point, leaving every day at around 11 am.

At Fort James, there is a well-maintained red brick building, and at Whim, a large plantation house. Arnos Vale Hotel is a former sugar plantation, now a hotel; a disused sugar mill fitted out with formidable crushing wheels, made in 1857, is still on the grounds. Englishman's Bay is an excellent place for a day trip. Birdwatching is a favourite pastime here. The hotel offers tea to non-residents during the late afternoon on the balcony above the gardens. This is a must for birdwatchers and needs to be booked by phone first.

Around Tobago

The fishing village of Plymouth has a mystery tombstone with inscriptions dating from 1700. Charlotteville is a fishing town commanding precipitous views of the headlands. Looming above the town is Pigeon Peak, the highest point on the island. There are good swimming beaches, including Pirate's Bay, which can only be reached by boat. Tobago Forest Reserve in the east has many trails which provide excellent long hikes for the more active visitor. On the Atlantic (windward) side of the island are many tiny villages including Mesopotamia and Goldsborough, the town of Roxborough and several beautiful bays. Speyside is a colourful beach settlement, from which can be seen tiny Goat Island and Little Tobago, a 182 hectare (450 acre) bird sanctuary. Speyside offers excellent snorkeling and scuba diving. Windward (Atlantic) beaches are wilder but just as picturesque as those on the Caribbean. On the north coast are the beautiful villages of Castara and Parlatuvier.

 

 
 

 



 


copyrights © AlloExpat.com
2015 | Policy